Women in Social Media, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Description: Women in Social Media explores and analyzes how women are represented globally through social media on a range of topics from women in politics to body image and how social media can be used for women’s empowerment and gender equality. It is a highly interactive course that strongly engages students in class discussion, visual and conceptual analysis, along with research and writing skills. Students create a WordPress blog where they dialogue with classmates about course topics such as rape, human trafficking, street harassment, raunch culture, motherhood, and women's health. The course has a strong visual component that challenges students not just to view the sexism that pervades media, but provides students with the invaluable ability to see space for change. The class is a very supportive, positive, and stimulating environment for peer interaction, self-reflection, and societal inquiry. Special attention is given to the work of the United Nations on gender initiatives, notably the Commission on the Status of Women, and is included in the curriculum. 

Racism and Sexism in the United States, William Paterson University

Description: Through text and social media, students in Racism and Sexism in the United States,  explore the largest societal systems of oppression: Sexism, Racism, Classism, and Heterosexism. This class is a safe, supportive space to share dialogue on personal experience and contemporary societal analysis. This course has a strong social media component that is used as a tool of study and applies to our readings and discussions on topics ranging widely from homelessness, Occupy Wall Street, contemporary politician and comedian comments on rape, the KKK to gay and ethnic rights through hip hop culture. The underlying foundation to this course is our shared humanity and the course concludes with a contemplation on the meaning of human experience. The most essential piece and deeply personal part of this course is our in-class three day Symposium on Humanity which was modeled after the compiled work called What Does it Mean to Be Human?, to which students develop personal essays and projects on their unique concept of humanity. 

Women in Contemporary Society, Ramapo College of New Jersey

To critique and analyze women’s status in a universal context through definitions and concepts of feminism, the constructs of what makes a woman, classic and modern female archetypes, women’s sexuality with particular regard to pornography and the model of virginity, women’s representation in rap and pop lyrics and videos, marriage and the role of wife and mother, woman as an employee, women and the environment, the education of girls, and women in religion. Special features of the course include the films, North Country  and a group project. Heavy emphasis is placed on media, class discussion, and readings assignments. This course will engage and develop interpersonal skills, creativity, reading, and writing skills in particular. Students will acquire an appreciation for gender equality in a safe, supportive, and positive place where personal stories and experiences are honored.

First Year Seminar, William Paterson University

An interactive and highly personalized course which will encourage you to explore everything from themes of humanity to basic college survival skills that will ensure your success as a college student. It is a safe space to explore yourself while in the company of your classmates who are on the same journey. Classes will be informative and enlightening with subjects ranging from the research paper process to stress management. Emphasis is placed on class discussion of assignments, personal sharing, and activities such as skits and an in class meditation. Assignments include highly acclaimed TED talks, as well as introspective journaling, performing a kind deed, and experiencing campus events. 

Critical Reading and Critical Thinking, Fairleigh Dickinson University

Critical Reading and Critical Thinking is an introductory course to college designed to teach students to think critically about text. Student will practice different reading comprehension strategies which will support their reading skills and assist them in producing critical writing. Students will develop the ability to process, interpret, and critique text through a series of ideas, patterns, and information so that you can answer the essential questions: what is being said and what is not being said. Additionally students will develop the ability to gather, evaluate, and question varying information, ideas, and opinions and intellectually navigate their own thoughts after a deep and inclusive analysis.

Gendered Lives and Societies, William Paterson University

In this course, you will learn to critique and analyze gender in a universal context as highlighted in definitions and concepts of feminism, the constructs of what makes a woman and man, classic and modern female and male archetypes, female sexuality with particular regard to pornography and the model of virginity, women’s representation in rap and pop lyrics and videos, marriage and what constitutes a healthy partnership, Malala Yousafzai as a leader in the education of girls, and women in religion. Special features of the course include the films, North Country and The Stoning of Soraya M. Heavy emphasis is placed on media and discussion during class time and readings from our text for assignments. This course will engage and develop interpersonal skills, creativity, and reading and writing skills in particular. Students will acquire an appreciation for gender equality and an intolerance for sexism. This will be a safe, supportive, and positive place where personal stories and experiences are welcomed and honored.

Race, Gender, and Social Justice, William Paterson University

This course will analyze social justice on a wide and varied spectrum of multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. Beyond our critique of these hierarchal structures and the divisions people have created, the underlying foundation to this course will be our shared humanity, as we contemplate the meaning of the human existence and share our own concepts of the human experience.